Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, California

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY IA Strict Nature Reserve: A marine reserve where the ecosystem is particularly fragile and important. Human activity here is strictly controlled, consisting of environmental monitoring, scientific surveys, and indigenous practices such as aboriginal subsistence fishing. Indigenous practices have to meet conservation objectives and may be subject to catch limits and other restrictions.

E.g. Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, California

Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY IB Wilderness Area:
A large natural area that is mostly untouched
by human activity and free of any modern infrastructure. Its management aims to preserve its natural condition for future generations.
E.g. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

Hallyeohaesang National Park, South Korea

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY II National Park: A large natural area set aside to protect its natural biodiversity and ecosystems, but with more lenient policies on human visitation and infrastructure to support education and recreation.
E.g. Hallyeohaesang National Park, South Korea

Blue Hole Natural Monument, Belize

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY III Natural Monument or Feature:
A small protected area around a natural monument such as a submarine cavern or a seamount, or a man-made monument. The latter must have ecological, historical or cultural significance to qualify. Policies centre around protecting the biodiversity and ecosystems that have formed around these monuments.
E.g. Blue Hole Natural Monument, Belize

South Ari Atoll, Maldives

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY IV HABITAT/Species Management Area: A protected area set aside to conserve a specific species or habitat. Policies aim to conserve or restore these species or habitats. Since these areas are so specific, they are commonly set up within a larger MPA to support conservation efforts.

E.g. South Ari Atoll, Maldives

Apo Island, Philippines

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY V Protected Seascape: One of the more flexible classifications, these areas allow a balanced amount of for-profit human activity. They are established where human activity has greatly influenced the surrounding ecosystem and has formed its own culture, such as ecotourism hotspots and dive sites. However, such activity is allowed on condition that the surrounding biospheres continue to be ecologically protected and restored.

E.g. Apo Island, Philippines

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

TYPES OF MPAS

No-take zone: An area set aside by the government where no extractive activity is allowed. Extractive activity is any action that removes, or extracts, any resource. Extractive activities include fishing, hunting, logging, mining, and drilling. Shell collecting and archaeological digging are also extractive.

E.g. Great Barrier Reef, Australia

(about one-third is a no-take zone)

Menai Bay Conservation Area, Zanzibar, Tanzania

TYPES OF MPAS

IUCN CATEGORY VI Protected Area with Sustainable Use of Natural Resources: These areas allow an extensive amount of human involvement, usually low-level, non-industrial use of natural resources. With non-industrial harvesting, authorities ensure that conservation as a main aim is still viable within this area.

E.g. Menai Bay Conservation Area, Zanzibar, Tanzania

Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

TYPES OF MPAS

World Heritage Site: Initiated by UNESCO, this area exhibits extensive natural or cultural history. Maritime areas are poorly represented, however, with only 46 out of over 800 sites.

E.g. Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

Post a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.