Exploding in a riot of life, the waters around these islands in the Indian Ocean are every diver’s wet dream. Text and Images by Imran Ahmad

Where are all the fish?” An increasingly common question asked by divers and underwater photographers. However, if you dive in the Seychelles, this would be very last question on your mind: In the Seychelles, there are almost too many fish.

Paradise underwater

Known for its thousands of colourful marine species, rich biodiversity and clear water, the Seychelles is famous for its national marine parks and its UNESCO World Heritage Sites – Vallee de Mai Nature Reserve and the Aldabra Atoll. The Seychelles is also celebrated as the home to more than 150,000 giant tortoises, walking amongst beach-goers like relics of a prehistoric era.

A diver’s paradise awaits in the Seychelles, where the visibility is extraordinary and the bright water is filled with massive schools of fish

These amazing, untouched islands (115 to be exact) are a paradise for any diver in search of an unforgettable diving adventure. In these warm waters, you are greeted by schools of fishes, giant trevally, barracuda, fusiliers and squadrons of eagle rays. The azure water is also home to visiting whale sharks and grey reef sharks. Unique underwater granite formations leave you breathless, while lush soft corals sway in the deeper water; all evidence of how wondrous Nature is.

A diver’s paradise awaits in the Seychelles, where the visibility is extraordinary and the bright water is filled with massive schools of fish

Setting the example

This is all thanks to marine protected areas (MPAs) that the Seychelles have in place. MPAs in the Seychelles include Ste. Anne Marine National Park, Curieuse Marine National Park, Baie Ternay Marine National Marine Park, Port Launay Marine National Park, Ile au Coco Marine National Park, Silhouette, and Aldabra Atoll.

A diver’s paradise awaits in the Seychelles, where the visibility is extraordinary and the bright water is filled with massive schools of fish

The Seychelles is recognised as the first country in the East African Region to create an MPA. Over the years, this fragile ecosystem has faced serious threats from fishing exploitation, unsustainable tourism, irresponsible boat anchoring, destruction of marine habitats, and other harmful consequences of human development. However, the Seychelles government has gone above and beyond to ensure that these threats are reduced and damage to their marine ecosystems is minimised.

For the rest of this article and other stories from this issue, see Scuba Diver 2017 Issue 2 No 108

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